Wesley’s Questions: “Do I Disobey God?”

 

Wesley’s Questions: “Do I Disobey God?”

A Message on Titus 3:1-7

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church

March 24, 2019

By Doug Wintermute

dwinterm@yahoo.com

 

Titus 3:1-7 (NRSV)

 

Remind them to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, 2 to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone. 3 For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, despicable, hating one another. 4 But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, 5 he saved us, not because of any works of righteousness that we had done, but according to his mercy, through the water of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit. 6 This Spirit he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, 7 so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.

 

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Today we continue our sermon series on the questions John and Charles Wesley’s “Holy Club” asked themselves everyday by examining the topic of obedience. The question the Holy Club used was this: “Do I disobey God in anything?”

 

Let’s just start out by talking about the word, “obey.” There are a lot of negative connotations with that word today. It’s the kind of word that make people bristle up and get angry.

 

There’s a story about a salesman that won an award that was a child’s toy. When he got home he gathered his three children and told them them that the one who had been most obedient would get the toy. The children seemed confused by this and one of them asked, “What does it mean to be obedient?”

 

The dad replied, “Well, which one of you talks back to your mother the least.” The kids still seemed confused so the father asked, “Who does everything your mom tells you to do?”

 

The kids looked at each other for a while. Finally the oldest one said, “Okay, dad. You get the toy.”

 

I think part of the reason that joke is funny, and the reason the word “obey” leaves such a bad taste in our mouths, is because our society focuses so much on individuality that the word “obey” is perceived as a threat to that individuality. It is perceived as someone or something trying to utilize power over an individual, and that doesn’t go well. It is looked at as something we teach our dogs to do.

 

But yet, we obey things every day. For example, if you are going to Tyler on 69 North you better set your cruise control on 55 mph until you get out to Love’s Lookout because if you don’t my neighbor, Dina Wilde, who is a City of Jacksonville police officer, WILL write you a ticket for not obeying the speed limit. (I think Dina would write her own mother a ticket.)

 

There are laws, both state laws and federal laws, that we are called to obey. If we don’t obey those laws, and if we get caught, we will be punished and possibly imprisoned.

 

Another example: this is tax season. If you don’t obey the tax laws and refuse to pay your income tax you will be punished. Not only can they give you monetary penalties, but if it’s bad enough you could go to prison.

 

Today in society I see many examples of people to disagree with a law or a rule, and so they purposefully disobey those laws and rules.

 

It really is nothing new. Back in the days of the apostle Paul we find people disobeying as well.

 

In the scripture we read today we find Paul writing to Titus, a leader in the early church, about some difficulties that are happening with the early Christians. Paul offers words of advice and encouragement for the early Christians, not only with regards to their behavior but also as they confront false teachers.

 

He tells Titus, “Remind them to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone.” — Titus 3:1-2

 

Just think how much better the world would be today if people did as Paul advises.

 

“…be subject to rulers and authorities…” Now I don’t want to get into politics, but I think we all know people who have fits about this, don’t we? Both with the current administration and the previous administration, the rancor and bitterness and just plain nastiness of what people say and post on social media is embarrassing. It’s bad. And it’s not Christian.

 

“…to be obedient…” Now Paul doesn’t say to what or whom to be obedient, but seeing as it comes right after the statement about rulers and authorities I and thinking it applies to them. I think it also applies to the scriptures as well, to be obedient to God and his Word.

 

“… to be ready for every good work…” Here I think Paul is telling us not to delay doing good work when the opportunities present themselves. I think he is telling us to avoid “paralysis by analysis” by doing good works as soon as you see a need.

 

“…to speak evil of no one…” Boy, would we use this rule on social media! As my mother used to remind us kids, “If you can’t say anything nice about someone, don’t say nothing at all.”

 

“…to avoid quarreling…” Again social media comes to my mind. But it isn’t limited to that. I am convinced that there are some people on this earth who just enjoy quarreling. It’s like a hobby or pastime with them.

 

“…to be gentle…” This is needed in today’s world as well. This doesn’t mean you let people walk all over you, but it is more about how we respond to other people and how we treat them.

 

“…to show every courtesy to everyone.” I still see courtesy today, especially in East Texas. People still hold doors open for others, skip the close up parking places to leave them for people who might be elderly or have trouble walking, and things like that. Of course there are people who are not courteous, but surely those aren’t Christians, right? And none of them go to this church, right?

 

Let me tell you about something that happened last week that I think incorporates all of these things that Paul writes about.

 

My roommate from seminary, Tommy Earl Burton, is the senior pastor at Tapp United Methodist Church in New Boston, TX. New Boston is just down the road from DeKalb, TX, where I used to pastor, and it was the closest “big town.”

 

There has been a ministry located in New Boston called “Manna Kitchen” that cooks and delivers food to about 80 people in the Bowie County area three times a week. This was a multi-denominational effort and people from the church I served in DeKalb would volunteer regularly to take meals to those who were homebound and/or unable to cook for themselves.

 

Well something happened recently involving Manna Kitchen and local politics and so the pastor of the ministry which has housed Manna Kitchen said he was shutting it down. This meant that 80 people in the area were no longer going to get meals delivered to them.

 

Tommy Earl and the members of his church got together and decided something needed to be done, so they did it. Starting this Wednesday meals will be prepared at Tapp United Methodist Church and then delivered by volunteers to the people in the area that need them.

 

Tommy Earl and I talked about it on the phone this last week and he said it was amazing how the Holy Spirit moved through the people of his church and the volunteers in order to make this happen.

 

Now listen to The Message paraphrase of that verse with respect to what Tapp UMC has done: “Remind the people to respect the government and be law-abiding, always ready to lend a helping hand. No insults, no fights. God’s people should be bighearted and courteous.”

 

The people at Tapp are respecting the government, making sure their food preparations are in compliance with city codes and food safety regulations. They have shown they are willing to “lend a helping hand.” They have not, and will not, say bad things about the pastor or the ministry that made the decision to close, they won’t fight about it on social media or in the newspaper. Instead they are “bighearted and courteous.”

 

Most of all they are obedient to God’s word. The great commandment is to love God and love others. They are being obedient and living out Jesus words in the 25th chapter of Matthew, “for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.”

 

Now I will admit that it is not easy to be obedient to God. The focus in our culture on individuality makes it difficult, because so many times God’s word tells us to put the interest and needs of others before ourselves. We live in a “me first” world, where it’s okay to do whatever is necessary to move on up the ladder of success.

 

The world tells us to be as Paul describes: “… foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, despicable, hating one another.” — Titus 3:3

 

But that’s not the way Christians should live. Not at all. And Paul tells us why: “But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of any works of righteousness that we had done, but according to his mercy, through the water of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit. This Spirit he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.” — Titus 3:4-7

 

When we accept Jesus as our savior we say goodby to our former lives, to the ways we used to live. We put off the old self and put on the Holy Spirit self. That is replaced with a Holy Spirit led obedience. And ironically, it is that obedience that gives us freedom.

 

In 2 John we read: “And this is love, that we walk according to his commandments; this is the commandment just as you have heard it from the beginning—you must walk in it.” — 2 John 1:6

 

In his book, A Long Obedience in the Same Direction, Eugene Peterson quotes Karl Barth about obedience: “Each act of obedience by the Christian is a modest proof, unequivocal for all its imperfection, of the reality of what he attests.”

 

Obedience is an important aspect of the Christian life. It is so important that the Wesleys thought it should be one of the 22 questions to reflect on daily. It is still critically important for us today.

 

So my challenge to you this week is that you will be obedient to God. I know the world will try to convince you that you shouldn’t be obedient to anything but your own desires, but Biblically we are called to just the opposite of that. We are to be obedient to God, to his word, to the life that Jesus Christ showed us how to live.

 

Obedience is a good thing, not a bad thing. Praise be to God.

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

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