John: Glory

John: Glory
A Message on John 12:36b-43
For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church
Aug. 9, 2020
By Doug Wintermute
dwinterm@yahoo.com

John 12:36b-43 (NRSV)

After Jesus had said this, he departed and hid from them. 37 Although he had performed so many signs in their presence, they did not believe in him. 38 This was to fulfill the word spoken by the prophet Isaiah:

“Lord, who has believed our message,
and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed?”

39 And so they could not believe, because Isaiah also said,

40 “He has blinded their eyes
and hardened their heart,
so that they might not look with their eyes,
and understand with their heart and turn—
and I would heal them.”

41 Isaiah said this because he saw his glory and spoke about him. 42 Nevertheless many, even of the authorities, believed in him. But because of the Pharisees they did not confess it, for fear that they would be put out of the synagogue; 43 for they loved human glory more than the glory that comes from God.

<> ><> ><> ><> ><> ><> ><>

In order for us to grasp what is happening in the scripture we read today from the Gospel of John we need to back up to the beginning of the 12th Chapter.

Jesus visits at the home of Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead, and his sisters Mary and Martha, . Martha serves him and Mary anoints Jesus’ feet with perfume, which drive’s Judas nuts because of the cost.

After that the Jewish leaders plot to kill Lazarus because of all the people coming to see him and people believing in Jesus because of him being raised from the dead.

Then Jesus enters Jerusalem triumphantly on a donkey with huge crowds surrounding him and running ahead of him.

Once in Jerusalem talks about his death and says, “God, I glorify your name.” Then a voice comes from heaven that says, “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.”

Some in the crowd thought the voice was thunder, while others thought it was an angel talking to Jesus. Jesus says, “This voice has come for your sake, not for mine. Now is the judgment of this world; now the ruler of this world will be driven out. And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself.”

Then the crowd starts arguing about whether he is the messiah or not, pointing out that the scriptures say the messiah will be with them forever and he is talking about being raised up.

That is when we come to today’s reading where Jesus leaves and hides from them. He has to get away from the crowds and the unbelief that so many in the crowd have about him.

The part of today’s scripture that I want to focus on today is the last paragraph: “Isaiah said this because he saw his glory and spoke about him. 42 Nevertheless many, even of the authorities, believed in him. But because of the Pharisees they did not confess it, for fear that they would be put out of the synagogue; 43 for they loved human glory more than the glory that comes from God.”

Here is The Message paraphrase of that scripture: “Isaiah said these things after he got a glimpse of God’s cascading brightness that would pour through the Messiah. On the other hand, a considerable number from the ranks of the leaders did believe. But because of the Pharisees, they didn’t come out in the open with it. They were afraid of getting kicked out of the meeting place. When push came to shove they cared more for human approval than for God’s glory.”

First let’s talk about glory? Just what exactly is glory?

The first thing that comes to my mind is the Battle Hymn of the Republic and it’s refrain:

Glory, glory, Hallelujah! Glory, glory, Hallelujah!
Glory, glory, Hallelujah! His truth is marching on.

It’s not a word we use much anymore but it is used in the Bible, 443 times to be exact (in the NRSV). In theology terms it means praise, worship, and thanksgiving given to God.

A new usage, which I didn’t know until working on this message, is that the word “glory” can also refer to the luminous ring or halo depicted in art around the head of Jesus or a saint. Hmmmm. You learn something new everyday…

Another way to think about “glory” is being “used to describe the manifestation of God’s presence as perceived by humans.” (That one is from Wikipedia, by the way.)

One of the ways I think of glory is when in the Old Testament Moses goes up on Mount Sinai to receive the 10 commandments. Here’s the way it is described in Exodus 24:13-15, “Then Moses went up on the mountain, and the cloud covered the mountain. 16 The glory of the Lord settled on Mount Sinai, and the cloud covered it for six days; on the seventh day he called to Moses out of the cloud. 17 Now the appearance of the glory of the Lord was like a devouring fire on the top of the mountain in the sight of the people of Israel.”

The spectacle really freaked out the Jewish people. They were fearful of God’s glory and wanted Moses to intercede for them, which he did. And when he came down the mountain his face glowed, which also freaked them out, so much so that he had to wear a veil when he was around people.

And yet after all that, after seeing all those things, the people still became stiff necked and disobeyed.

Another way I think of glory is when it comes to the tabernacle and temple the Jewish people used to worship God. We find several references in scripture where the tabernacle, the place it was believed that God resided on earth, was completed. Here is Exodus 40:34-35, “Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. Moses was not able to enter the tent of meeting because the cloud settled upon it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.”

We find the same thing happening at the completion of the temple under the leadership of King Solomon. “… the house of the Lord, was filled with a cloud, so that the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of the Lord filled the house of God.” 2 Chronicles 5:13b-14

So we have that concept of glory from the Old Testament scriptures, along with Moses going into a cleft of a rock for protection when the glory of the Lord passed by, because no one can see the face of the Lord and live. (Exodus 33)

With that frame of mind, let’s look at that last paragraph of today’s scripture reading. “…for they loved human glory more than the glory that comes from God.”

In our society today we glorify people in many different ways. A superstar athlete is glorified for their athletic skills (and sometimes their scandalous actions). Movie stars are glorified for their abilities to act (and sometimes their scandalous actions). Recording artists are glorified for their music (and sometimes their scandalous actions). Successful businessmen or politicians are glorified for their leadership (and sometimes their scandalous actions).

Fame is an interesting phenomenon.

I am currently reading a biography of Ulysses S. Grant by Rob Chernow that I find to be fascinating.

First, did you know his name really wasn’t Ulysses S. Grant? It was Hiram Ulysses Grant but when he was appointed to West Point he tried to reverse his first and middle name so that his initials wouldn’t spell HUG, but the paperwork got messed up and he went with Ulysses S. Grant, contending that the “S” didn’t stand for anything.

Also I found out that he was Methodist! Yep! Several times in the book the author refers to his attending Methodist churches and how his Methodist upbringing formed his moral values.

I also learned that he had several failures before he succeeded in moving up the military ranks and leading all the Union forces during the United States Civil War.

After winning the war for the Union, Grant became a celebrity even though he really didn’t want to be. He shied away from the spotlight but was unable to after the war. Whenever accolades were heaped upon him he deflected them from himself and gave credit to the brave men who fought under his command. He didn’t want glory for himself but sought to glorify those who fought, and the thousands who died, for the Union cause.

Grant was adamantly anti-slavery and worked hard after the war to protect and give full rights, including the right to vote, to the freed slaves. He even went so far as to buck President Andrew Johnson, who as vice president became president after the assasination of Abraham Lincoln. Johnson wanted to please southern plantation owners and was very racist in his views of the freed slaves.

Now Grant wasn’t perfect. He had a weakness for alcoholic beverages, something he fought throughout his career. He was naive and trusted people, many who took advantage of him and fleeced money from him.

But throughout the book (well, the parts of it that I have read so far) I have been impressed with his desire to give glory to others other than himself.

It’s difficult not to seek human glory, isn’t it? Who doesn’t want to be admired, honored, acclaimed, celebrated, praised, and recognized? I think it’s part of human nature that we want to be liked by others, and another part of our human nature to be considered better than others.

But there is a danger in that. When we seek the praise and glory of others we are metaphorically creating a false idol that we begin to worship, instead of worshipping God.

Equally–or maybe more so–dangerous is our glorification of others. Like Dorothy and the characters in the Wizard of Oz we lift up others to the point of worship, only to find out when we look behind the curtains that they are only human, complete with human flaws, weaknesses, and mistakes.

We have to be aware of becoming like the Pharisees in today’s scripture who loved human glory more than the glory that comes from God.

We need to periodically pose the question to ourselves that the Apostle Paul writes in the first chapter of Galatians: “Am I now seeking human approval, or God’s approval? Or am I trying to please people? If I were still pleasing people, I would not be a servant of Christ.”

So my challenge to you this week is to be conscious of seeking human glory. Instead, seek to glorify God through the words you say, the actions you take, and by how you love others. Let us not be like the Pharisees, but let us be like Jesus Christ himself, giving glory and honor to our father in heaven.

Glory, glory, Hallelujah! His truth is marching on.

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *