Wesley’s Questions: “Do I Disobey God?”

 

Wesley’s Questions: “Do I Disobey God?”

A Message on Titus 3:1-7

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church

March 24, 2019

By Doug Wintermute

dwinterm@yahoo.com

 

Titus 3:1-7 (NRSV)

 

Remind them to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, 2 to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone. 3 For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, despicable, hating one another. 4 But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, 5 he saved us, not because of any works of righteousness that we had done, but according to his mercy, through the water of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit. 6 This Spirit he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, 7 so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.

 

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Today we continue our sermon series on the questions John and Charles Wesley’s “Holy Club” asked themselves everyday by examining the topic of obedience. The question the Holy Club used was this: “Do I disobey God in anything?”

 

Let’s just start out by talking about the word, “obey.” There are a lot of negative connotations with that word today. It’s the kind of word that make people bristle up and get angry.

 

There’s a story about a salesman that won an award that was a child’s toy. When he got home he gathered his three children and told them them that the one who had been most obedient would get the toy. The children seemed confused by this and one of them asked, “What does it mean to be obedient?”

 

The dad replied, “Well, which one of you talks back to your mother the least.” The kids still seemed confused so the father asked, “Who does everything your mom tells you to do?”

 

The kids looked at each other for a while. Finally the oldest one said, “Okay, dad. You get the toy.”

 

I think part of the reason that joke is funny, and the reason the word “obey” leaves such a bad taste in our mouths, is because our society focuses so much on individuality that the word “obey” is perceived as a threat to that individuality. It is perceived as someone or something trying to utilize power over an individual, and that doesn’t go well. It is looked at as something we teach our dogs to do.

 

But yet, we obey things every day. For example, if you are going to Tyler on 69 North you better set your cruise control on 55 mph until you get out to Love’s Lookout because if you don’t my neighbor, Dina Wilde, who is a City of Jacksonville police officer, WILL write you a ticket for not obeying the speed limit. (I think Dina would write her own mother a ticket.)

 

There are laws, both state laws and federal laws, that we are called to obey. If we don’t obey those laws, and if we get caught, we will be punished and possibly imprisoned.

 

Another example: this is tax season. If you don’t obey the tax laws and refuse to pay your income tax you will be punished. Not only can they give you monetary penalties, but if it’s bad enough you could go to prison.

 

Today in society I see many examples of people to disagree with a law or a rule, and so they purposefully disobey those laws and rules.

 

It really is nothing new. Back in the days of the apostle Paul we find people disobeying as well.

 

In the scripture we read today we find Paul writing to Titus, a leader in the early church, about some difficulties that are happening with the early Christians. Paul offers words of advice and encouragement for the early Christians, not only with regards to their behavior but also as they confront false teachers.

 

He tells Titus, “Remind them to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone.” — Titus 3:1-2

 

Just think how much better the world would be today if people did as Paul advises.

 

“…be subject to rulers and authorities…” Now I don’t want to get into politics, but I think we all know people who have fits about this, don’t we? Both with the current administration and the previous administration, the rancor and bitterness and just plain nastiness of what people say and post on social media is embarrassing. It’s bad. And it’s not Christian.

 

“…to be obedient…” Now Paul doesn’t say to what or whom to be obedient, but seeing as it comes right after the statement about rulers and authorities I and thinking it applies to them. I think it also applies to the scriptures as well, to be obedient to God and his Word.

 

“… to be ready for every good work…” Here I think Paul is telling us not to delay doing good work when the opportunities present themselves. I think he is telling us to avoid “paralysis by analysis” by doing good works as soon as you see a need.

 

“…to speak evil of no one…” Boy, would we use this rule on social media! As my mother used to remind us kids, “If you can’t say anything nice about someone, don’t say nothing at all.”

 

“…to avoid quarreling…” Again social media comes to my mind. But it isn’t limited to that. I am convinced that there are some people on this earth who just enjoy quarreling. It’s like a hobby or pastime with them.

 

“…to be gentle…” This is needed in today’s world as well. This doesn’t mean you let people walk all over you, but it is more about how we respond to other people and how we treat them.

 

“…to show every courtesy to everyone.” I still see courtesy today, especially in East Texas. People still hold doors open for others, skip the close up parking places to leave them for people who might be elderly or have trouble walking, and things like that. Of course there are people who are not courteous, but surely those aren’t Christians, right? And none of them go to this church, right?

 

Let me tell you about something that happened last week that I think incorporates all of these things that Paul writes about.

 

My roommate from seminary, Tommy Earl Burton, is the senior pastor at Tapp United Methodist Church in New Boston, TX. New Boston is just down the road from DeKalb, TX, where I used to pastor, and it was the closest “big town.”

 

There has been a ministry located in New Boston called “Manna Kitchen” that cooks and delivers food to about 80 people in the Bowie County area three times a week. This was a multi-denominational effort and people from the church I served in DeKalb would volunteer regularly to take meals to those who were homebound and/or unable to cook for themselves.

 

Well something happened recently involving Manna Kitchen and local politics and so the pastor of the ministry which has housed Manna Kitchen said he was shutting it down. This meant that 80 people in the area were no longer going to get meals delivered to them.

 

Tommy Earl and the members of his church got together and decided something needed to be done, so they did it. Starting this Wednesday meals will be prepared at Tapp United Methodist Church and then delivered by volunteers to the people in the area that need them.

 

Tommy Earl and I talked about it on the phone this last week and he said it was amazing how the Holy Spirit moved through the people of his church and the volunteers in order to make this happen.

 

Now listen to The Message paraphrase of that verse with respect to what Tapp UMC has done: “Remind the people to respect the government and be law-abiding, always ready to lend a helping hand. No insults, no fights. God’s people should be bighearted and courteous.”

 

The people at Tapp are respecting the government, making sure their food preparations are in compliance with city codes and food safety regulations. They have shown they are willing to “lend a helping hand.” They have not, and will not, say bad things about the pastor or the ministry that made the decision to close, they won’t fight about it on social media or in the newspaper. Instead they are “bighearted and courteous.”

 

Most of all they are obedient to God’s word. The great commandment is to love God and love others. They are being obedient and living out Jesus words in the 25th chapter of Matthew, “for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.”

 

Now I will admit that it is not easy to be obedient to God. The focus in our culture on individuality makes it difficult, because so many times God’s word tells us to put the interest and needs of others before ourselves. We live in a “me first” world, where it’s okay to do whatever is necessary to move on up the ladder of success.

 

The world tells us to be as Paul describes: “… foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, despicable, hating one another.” — Titus 3:3

 

But that’s not the way Christians should live. Not at all. And Paul tells us why: “But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of any works of righteousness that we had done, but according to his mercy, through the water of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit. This Spirit he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life.” — Titus 3:4-7

 

When we accept Jesus as our savior we say goodby to our former lives, to the ways we used to live. We put off the old self and put on the Holy Spirit self. That is replaced with a Holy Spirit led obedience. And ironically, it is that obedience that gives us freedom.

 

In 2 John we read: “And this is love, that we walk according to his commandments; this is the commandment just as you have heard it from the beginning—you must walk in it.” — 2 John 1:6

 

In his book, A Long Obedience in the Same Direction, Eugene Peterson quotes Karl Barth about obedience: “Each act of obedience by the Christian is a modest proof, unequivocal for all its imperfection, of the reality of what he attests.”

 

Obedience is an important aspect of the Christian life. It is so important that the Wesleys thought it should be one of the 22 questions to reflect on daily. It is still critically important for us today.

 

So my challenge to you this week is that you will be obedient to God. I know the world will try to convince you that you shouldn’t be obedient to anything but your own desires, but Biblically we are called to just the opposite of that. We are to be obedient to God, to his word, to the life that Jesus Christ showed us how to live.

 

Obedience is a good thing, not a bad thing. Praise be to God.

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

Wesleyan Roots: “The Almost Christian”

 

Wesleyan Roots: “The Almost Christian” #2

A Message on Acts 26:24-29

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church

Nov. 18, 2018

By Doug Wintermute

dwinterm@yahoo.com

 

Acts 26:24-29 (NRSV)

 

While he was making this defense, Festus exclaimed, “You are out of your mind, Paul! Too much learning is driving you insane!” 25 But Paul said, “I am not out of my mind, most excellent Festus, but I am speaking the sober truth. 26 Indeed the king knows about these things, and to him I speak freely; for I am certain that none of these things has escaped his notice, for this was not done in a corner. 27 King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe.” 28 Agrippa said to Paul, “Are you so quickly persuading me to become a Christian?” 29 Paul replied, “Whether quickly or not, I pray to God that not only you but also all who are listening to me today might become such as I am—except for these chains.”

 

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Let’s start today by looking at the scripture and figure out what is going on.

 

Let’s go back several chapters in Acts to the 21st chapter. There we find Paul arriving in Jerusalem after traveling. He meets with the apostles, meets with James, and then things go downhill.

 

Some Jews from Asia start stirring up trouble for Paul, saying he is teaching false things about the Jewish religion. The crowd becomes violent and tries to kill Paul, but the authorities come and take him away for questioning.

 

After spending some time away from the crowd, Paul asks to address the crowd, which he does. He tells the story of his conversion and how Jesus is the fulfillment of the Jewish scriptures, but they didn’t believe him and shouted for this death.

 

The Roman tribune then had Paul strung up to be whipped, which they called “examined,” (yeah, right) but before the Centurion could begin Paul told them that he was a Roman citizen and, therefore, it wasn’t legal for them to whip him. So they stopped.

 

They brought Paul before the Jewish Council, including Ananias, the high priest, and asked him questions. The Jews were still against Paul, taking a vow to fast from eating until he was dead. So the tribune had soldiers take Paul to Caesarea to the governor there.

 

The governor, Felix, has Paul brought before him and Paul again makes his defense. Felix is intrigued by what Paul says, and sends for him and talks to him frequently, but doesn’t free him.

 

This goes on for two years. After that period of time Felix is replaced by Festus.  (And no, not the Festus on the TV series “Gunsmoke.”)

 

Festus listens to Paul’s case and offers to send Paul back to Jerusalem to stand trial, which is what the Jews wanted because they were going to ambush Paul along the way and kill him. But Paul, at that point, appeals to the Emperor, meaning he wanted his case tried before the emperor in Rome. And Festus grants Paul’s request.

 

While Paul waits in prison, King Agrippa, the Roman ruler over the Judea area, comes and visits with Festus. So Festus arranges for Paul to come before King Agrippa to state his case, and Paul does.

 

That’s where we pick up the scripture we read today. Paul tells of his conversion, of his preaching, and even has the audacity to try to talk the king into becoming a follower of Christ.

 

Paul asks, “King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe.”

 

Agrippa replies, “Are you so quickly persuading me to become a Christian?”

 

In the King James translation of the Bible, which is what John Wesley would have been using, it is phrased as: “Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.”

 

Almost persuaded. And it is from this that John Wesley writes his sermon titled, “The Almost Christian.”

 

King Agrippa was almost a Christian, but not quite. Almost. Close. But not there.

 

Wesley uses that as a metaphor for people who may claim they are Christian, but really are not. Those who may claim to be Christian, but whose actions, deeds, and words are not in line with Christian beliefs and practices.

 

According to Wesley, being an “altogether Christian,” instead of an “almost Christian, requires “… a sure trust and confidence which a man hath in God, that, by the merits of Christ, his sins are forgiven, and he reconciled to the favour of God; whereof doth follow a loving heart, to obey his commandments.”

 

He goes on to ask a series of questions that he encourages people to ask themselves as a form of self examination, to determine if they are an “altogether Christian,” or an “almost Christian”:

 

“Is the love of God shed abroad in your heart? Can you cry out, ‘My God, and my All’? Do you desire nothing but him? Are you happy in God? Is he your glory, your delight, your crown of rejoicing? And is this commandment written in your heart, ‘That he who loveth God love his brother also’? Do you then love your neighbour as yourself? Do you love every man, even your enemies, even the enemies of God, as your own soul? as Christ loved you? Yea, dost thou believe that Christ loved thee, and gave himself for thee? Hast thou faith in his blood? Believest thou the Lamb of God hath taken away thy sins, and cast them as a stone into the depth of the sea? that he hath blotted out the handwriting that was against thee, taking it out of the way, nailing it to his cross? Hast thou indeed redemption through his blood, even the remission of thy sins? And doth his Spirit bear witness with thy spirit, that thou art a child of God?”

 

Ouch. Pretty serious words there, John. But important reflections.

 

Our world today is full of “almost Christians,” people who claim the that they are Christians but who don’t live up to what it means to be an “altogether Christian.”

 

So, is it okay to be an “almost Christian”? There is a saying at “close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.” Does being “close” apply to Christianity, too? Is it acceptable to be “close enough”?

 

So let’s ponder some things in our world that are “almost.” I have some photos to help us visualize these things.

 

Is fixing a broken tooth with superglue “almost” like going to a dentist? (Dr. Brad Westbrook, a dentist and member of our congregation, tells me that he has seen people do this. He also says it never works out very well, either. So, please, don’t try it.)

 

Here is a fish I caught a while back. This “almost” a state record bass, right?

 

Here is a tattoo someone got. It is “almost” correct, right?

 

Here is a homemade auto repair to replace an air intake hose. It’s “almost” as good as that actual part, right?

 

Here’s a homemade hot tub. It’s “almost” as good as a store bought one, right?

 

Here’s another creative auto repair. Those wooden stools are “almost” as good as the original seats, right?

 

Here is a photo of an “almost” lion. It’s actually a dog wearing a fake mane, but it’s “almost” a lion, right?

 

Ahh, here’s a homemade pontoon boat. It’s “almost” as good as one you can by at Sadler’s Marine, right?

 

Now those are humorous but the point I want to make is serious: are you an “almost Christian”?

 

“Altogether Christians” are those who are completely devoted to fulfilling the great commandment to love god and love others. Not just “almost,” not just “sorta-kinda,” not just at certain times or certain situations, but all the time. Not just for certain people, but for all. It’s a matter of the heart. It’s a matter of discipline.

 

One of the things John Wesley was really passionate about was encouraging others to “holy living.” When we think of that term we might envision some monks or nuns in a monastery or convent, but that’s not what Wesley is talking about. For him holy living meant spending time each day in prayer, in reading the scriptures, and in doing things to benefit others. It wasn’t to separate oneself from society, but to live holy lives in society, serving as an example of the love of Christ.

 

Wesley saw small groups as the key to holy living. The small groups would meet together, discuss the scriptures, pray, and hold each other accountable, asking each person to profess the times when they let God down during the week.

 

We have gotten away from that today in the church, unfortunately. For so many Christians church is just another activity to check off on the list of activities. Go to church on Sunday: check. Go to work on Monday: check. Go to the grocery store on Tuesday: check. And sometimes church doesn’t even make that list.

 

Here at Jacksonville FUMC we have between 900 and 1,000 members on the rolls. Those are official members. And yet look around. This sanctuary can seat 500 people comfortably. And yet our average Sunday attendance last year was 233. This year it is beginning to look like it might even be lower than that.

 

Why? I’ll probably get in trouble for saying this (but you know I’m going to say it anyway), but I believe it’s because we have too many “almost Christians.” Now I know every person can’t make it to church every Sunday, but when the lay leadership committee (what used to be the nominations committee) was going through the official roster of members looking for people to serve in different leadership positions, the phrases, “I didn’t know they were members,” or “I’ve never seen them at church,” or “Why are they on here?” were used way too much.

 

How many of our members are seeking to live holy lives? After all, Hebrews 12:14 says, “Make every effort to live in peace with everyone and to be holy; without holiness no one will see the Lord.”

 

Now I’ll let you in on a little secret. If you think I’m coming down to hard on our church members remember that the person the preacher preaches to the most is himself or herself. The scriptures convict me, and Wesley’s sermons convict me. But I think it’s something we all need to hear. We have to stop being “almost Christians.” We are commanded to be “altogether Christians.”

 

So my challenge to you–and me–this week is to be an “altogether Christian.” Let us not be like King Agrippa, an “almost Christian.” To paraphrase Wesley, let us:

 

Share the love of God that is in our hearts. Let us make God our all, desiring nothing but him. Let us be happy in God, making him our glory, our delight, our crown of rejoicing. Let us write the commandment to love god and love others on our hearts, loving our neighbor, which is everybody, even our enemies and the enemies of God, as we love ourselves, the way Christ loved us. Let us believe that Christ not only loved us, but gave himself up for us. Let us have faith in his blood, believing that Jesus, as the Lamb of God, has taken away our sins and thrown them away to the bottom of the sea, that he has erased our sins by nailing them to the cross. Let us remember that we are a redeemed people through his blood, which erases our sins. And let his Spirit be found in our spirit, what we are children of God.

 

That is what “altogether Christians” should look like.

 

And please, if you break a tooth, don’t try to superglue it back on yourself. You only “almost” fix it.

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Wesleyan Roots: “Temptation”

 

Wesleyan Roots: “Temptation”

A Message on 1 Corinthians 10:6-13

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church
Oct. 7, 2018
By Doug Wintermute
dwinterm@yahoo.com

1 Corinthians 10:6-13 (NRSV)

 

Now these things occurred as examples for us, so that we might not desire evil as they did. 7 Do not become idolaters as some of them did; as it is written, “The people sat down to eat and drink, and they rose up to play.” 8 We must not indulge in sexual immorality as some of them did, and twenty-three thousand fell in a single day. 9 We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did, and were destroyed by serpents. 10 And do not complain as some of them did, and were destroyed by the destroyer. 11 These things happened to them to serve as an example, and they were written down to instruct us, on whom the ends of the ages have come. 12 So if you think you are standing, watch out that you do not fall. 13 No testing has overtaken you that is not common to everyone. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tested beyond your strength, but with the testing he will also provide the way out so that you may be able to endure it.

 

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Today we are continuing our sermon series on “Wesleyan Roots” by exploring 1 Corinthians 10:6-13 and John Wesley’s sermon on that scripture titled simply, “Temptation.”

 

Now I’m sure most of us are aware of what temptation is, right? It’s a desire someone has to do something, usually something that is not good.

 

Now in the scripture we read today the author, the Apostle Paul, is talking about people that caved in to temptation. He’s talking about the Israelites from back in the old Testament.

 

If you remember back in Exodus Moses goes to the Pharaoh of Egypt and says, [sing] “Pharaoh, Pharaoh, ohhhh baby, let my people go. Ugh! Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.”

 

Pharaoh finally lets them go, the people travel to the Red Sea,  Pharaoh changes his mind and sends his army after them to annihilate them, but then God parts the waters and the people walked through the sea to the other side. And when Pharaoh’s army tried to follow them the waters covered them and they drowned.

 

So they go to the base of Mt. Horeb, also known as Mt. Saini, and the people get freaked out by fire and smoky clouds and trumpet blasts and so Moses goes up on the mountain to speak with God and he gets the 10 commandments.

 

Now prior to this the people say that they will listen to God and do whatever God says. “Everything that the Lord has spoken we will do,” they promised. (Exodus 19:8)

 

And yet, when Moses is not as quick about coming back down the mountain as they expected, what do they do? They give in to temptation. They convince Aaron, who is Moses’ brother that he leaves in charge of the people while he’s gone, to make a golden calf for them to worship.

 

And Aaron does.

 

Now here’s what I think is the interesting part. The Israelites demand a golden calf, so where does Aaron get the gold? From the Israelites. He has them give him their earrings that they had. And where did the Israelites get the gold earrings? After all, they were slaves in Egypt, right, and slaves don’t have gold.

 

They got them from the Egyptians as they left. Yep. They plundered the Egyptians for gold and silver and the Egyptians gave it to them because they were happy to see them go. The 10 plagues more than convinced them to let them go.

 

So the Israelites, who finally obtain freedom from the Egyptians, take the gold they had plundered from the Egyptians, made a golden calf like the Egyptians, and worshipped it like the Egyptians.

 

They became like the Egyptians. Even though they had been held as slaves by the Egyptians, even though they had been mistreated by the Egyptians, and even though the Egyptians did things like making a law to kill all male Israelite babies, they still became like the Egyptians.

 

They gave in to temptation and became like the very people that had oppressed them.

 

That’s what Paul is talking about in the scripture today. He is talking about how the Israelites kept giving in to temptation instead of following God’s laws and trusting in God.

 

And then he adds some words of advice: “So if you think you are standing, watch out that you do not fall.” (1 Corinthians 10:12)

 

In other words, don’t get too comfortable thinking you are winning the war against temptation, because when you become complacent and don’t focus on resisting temptation, those are the times that you are most vulnerable.

 

In his sermon on temptation, John Wesley expounds on this: “Do not Satan and his angels continually go about seeking whom they may devour? Who is out of reach of their malice and subtlety? Not the wisest or the best of the children of men.”

 

We all get tempted. It’s just part of human nature. And Satan is very good at tempting us with those things that we are most susceptible to. Whatever happens to be your achilles heel, that’s where Satan will aim his arrows.

 

If you have a weakness for food, that’s where Satan will aim his temptations. If it is an attraction to persons other than your spouse, Satan will put some gorgeous individuals in your path. If it is buying new things, you will find some things on sale that will be extremely hard to resist. If it’s alcohol or drugs, you will find those things popping up and available to you. If it’s money, you will face situations that might be a little shady, illegal, or even maybe immoral but that could earn you some money.

 

You get the idea. And don’t think it doesn’t happen to you. It does, and it will.

 

I gave into temptation this week. Many of you may not know that I used to play trombone. I paid for most of my first two years of college at Henderson County Junior College with a music scholarship playing trombone.

 

Well Mike Kellogg, our music director, found an old trombone at a garage sale. It wasn’t very shiny and pretty but it was a brand-name trombone and it had a trigger, which means you can play notes easier and deeper than a trombone without a trigger.

 

Anyway, Mike and I got to talking about trombones this past week and started talking about this trombone. I was tempted to buy it. Really tempted. We talked some more and ended up agreeing on a deal for me to buy the trombone. I was excited! I got it home, put a mouthpiece on it, and started playing it. Or start trying to play it. It was pretty awful. Well, that’s not exactly true. It was REALLY awful!

 

I couldn’t resist the temptation to buy that trombone. Pam wasn’t too happy when she got home and I had to confess to her what I had done. (She’s STILL not happy…)

 

We will always have temptations. That’s the bad news. The good news is that God gives us the power to overcome those temptations. But there is a catch: you have to work at it. You have to try. You have to consciously decide to resist temptations.

 

Paul writes about this in his letter to the church at Corinth that we read from today.

 

“No testing has overtaken you that is not common to everyone. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tested beyond your strength, but with the testing he will also provide the way out so that you may be able to endure it.”

 

Here’s how Wesley describes it. “He [God] sees exactly how much we can endure with our present degree of strength. And if this is not sufficient, he can increase it to whatever degree it pleases him. Nothing, therefore, is more certain, than that, in consequence of his wisdom, as well as his justice, mercy, and faithfulness, he never will, he never can, suffer us to be tempted above that we are able: Above the strength which he either hath given already, or will give as soon as we need it.”

 

Now I want to offer something here that I think is important with regard to temptation. I don’t believe God tempts us, but that God allows us to be tempted. For me this is a big differentiation. Now God has the power to cause us to be tempted, that I believe, but I don’t believe it’s in God’s nature to use that power to purposefully tempt us.

 

One of the reasons I believe this is because of what is written in the first chapter of James: “No one, when tempted, should say, ‘I am being tempted by God’; for God cannot be tempted by evil and he himself tempts no one.”

 

So God doesn’t do the tempting. No. But, God does provide us with the strength to overcome those temptations.

 

Wesley summarizes it this way: “Let us then receive every trial with calm resignation, and with humble confidence that He who hath all power, all wisdom, all mercy, and all faithfulness, will first support us in every temptation, and then deliver us out of all: So that in the end all things shall work together for good, and we shall happily experience, that all these things were for our profit, that we ‘might be partakers of his holiness.’”

 

It is important for us to remember that Jesus was tempted. Prior to beginning his ministry, right after he was baptized, he spent 40 days and 40 nights in the wilderness where Satan appears and tempts him three times. He tempts Jesus with food, with ego, and with power. Each time Jesus responds with quotes from Deuteronomy, successfully resisting the temptations.

 

Why does it matter than Jesus was tempted? Because Jesus was fully human as well as fully divine. Jesus experienced everything that we experience as humans. That includes temptations.

 

Jesus resisted temptation, and so can we. It’s not easy, and it requires us to lean upon the power of God to be successful, but it can be done. And it should be done.

 

So my challenge to you this week is to resist temptation. Acknowledge that you don’t have the power to be successful resisting temptation by yourself, but utilize the power God provides to overcome temptation.

 

And if you want to get together to help me practice my trombone, let me know. (But don’t tell Pam.)

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

Faithbook: “Comments”

 

Faithbook–Biblical Lessons for the Digital Age: “Comments”
A Message on James 3:2-12

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church
Sept. 16, 2018
By Doug Wintermute
dwinterm@yahoo.com

James 3:2-12 (NRSV)

 

For all of us make many mistakes. Anyone who makes no mistakes in speaking is perfect, able to keep the whole body in check with a bridle. 3 If we put bits into the mouths of horses to make them obey us, we guide their whole bodies. 4 Or look at ships: though they are so large that it takes strong winds to drive them, yet they are guided by a very small rudder wherever the will of the pilot directs. 5 So also the tongue is a small member, yet it boasts of great exploits.

How great a forest is set ablaze by a small fire! 6 And the tongue is a fire. The tongue is placed among our members as a world of iniquity; it stains the whole body, sets on fire the cycle of nature, and is itself set on fire by hell. 7 For every species of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by the human species, 8 but no one can tame the tongue—a restless evil, full of deadly poison. 9 With it we bless the Lord and Father, and with it we curse those who are made in the likeness of God. 10 From the same mouth come blessing and cursing. My brothers and sisters, this ought not to be so. 11 Does a spring pour forth from the same opening both fresh and brackish water? 12 Can a fig tree, my brothers and sisters, yield olives, or a grapevine figs? No more can salt water yield fresh.

 

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One of the great things about Facebook is the ability to comment on the posts that other people make. It’s a great way to be able to participate in someone’s life without actually being there physically.

 

But comments are a double-edged sword. While comments can celebrate an accomplishment or comfort someone who is hurting, comments can also be used negatively and can cause pain and harm others.

 

We talked earlier in this series on “Messages” how cyber-bullying has become so common and is having devastating consequences. Cyber-bullying is common among the “comments” made on social media.

 

In the modern technological nomenclature we find the term “troll” being used to describe people who leave particular kinds of comments. Now when I was growing up a “troll” was a mythical fairy-tale-type person who lived under bridge. And then there came along some little doll things with long hair and even cartoons. But nowadays it’s a lot different. The word has new meaning.

 

Here’s a definition I found on the Internet by a guy at the University of Nebraska that apparently studies social media: “Trolling is defined as creating discord on the Internet by starting quarrels or upsetting people by posting inflammatory or off-topic messages in an online community. Basically, a social media troll is someone who purposely says something controversial in order to get a rise out of other users.” [https://unlcms.unl.edu/engineering/james-hanson/trolls-and-their-impact-social-media]

 

Unfortunately there are a lot of “trolls” out there in social media land. There are a lot of very inflammatory comments made about just about everything. Some of them are mean. And some of them are just downright evil. It’s sad. Very sad.

 

I think one of the reason there are so many negative messages on social media is because we can respond instantaneously. If someone posts something that you disagree with or that angers you, the technology allows us to respond immediately from the emotional part of our brains, not the logical and contemplative part of our brains. We don’t think before we write.

 

Can you imagine if we commented on posts with handwritten letters that went through the mail instead of through the instantaneous aether of the Internet? I think the time it would take to write it down on a piece of paper, find an envelope, put a stamp on it, and mail it would give us time to cool off and not be so reactionary.

 

I think another reason things have gotten so bad is that people can hide behind a cloak of anonymity when they post comments. Some of the worst “trolls” have fake accounts or accounts with very limited information about the person writing it. Technology allows us to fudge the truth about ourselves and to be able to write things without having to stand up to the consequences of and be responsible for saying them. It gives us the ability to write things that we would never say to a person if we were standing face to face with them.

 

Years ago Brad Paisley wrote a cute song called “Online” that is about a guy that lives a double life. In real life he’s 5’3”, overweight, works at a pizza place, lives with his parents, and drives an old, beat up Hyundai. But the image he presents on the Internet is much different. Here are some of the lyrics:

 

‘Cause online I’m down in Hollywood
I’m 6’5 and I look real good [Note: Yes, I know he uses a word other than “real,” but hey, we’re in church…]
I drive a Maserati
I’m a black belt in Karate
And I love a good glass of wine”

 

The end of the chorus is:

 

“I’m so much cooler online
So much cooler online”

 

Like we discussed last week, social media is a very powerful communication tool. How we behave “online” can make it good, or it can make it bad.

 

The book of James in the New Testament is direct and straightforward. Written by the half brother of Jesus, one of the early church leaders, James tells truths that were perhaps uncomfortable for the early church members to hear, just as they can be uncomfortable for us to hear as well.

 

In the scripture we read today, James talks about the power of the tongue. Now when we think about the tongue we think about speaking, but James is using the tongue as a metaphor for our words.

 

While in Jesus time in the first century most communication was by the spoken word, James’ scriptures still apply to us today when technology provides us with a wide variety of almost instantaneous communications. Some of it is still speaking words, but a lot of it is by, to paraphrase an old Yellow Pages ad, letting our fingers do the talking through the keyboards of our phones and computers.

 

Listen to verse 6 again: “And the tongue is a fire. The tongue is placed among our members as a world of iniquity; it stains the whole body, sets on fire the cycle of nature, and is itself set on fire by hell.”

 

Gee, James. Why don’t you tell us what you think?

 

Words matter. Comments matter.

 

I am amazed by some of the comments I read on social media. And I am even more amazed by some of the comments I read on social media posted by fellow clergy members.

 

We have forgotten James’ advice on how we use words and the power those words have.

 

James points out that with the same tongue we bless God and curse others. And he also points out that it shouldn’t be that way.

 

As I have said before, one of the reasons the “unchurched” say they don’t want anything to do with church (or religion, for that matter) is because of what they perceive as hypocrisy. The people that attend church act one way on Sundays and then act the complete opposite the rest of the days of the week. They praise God with their comments on Sunday and then treat others in ways that are anything but godly the rest of the week.

 

Their “comments” keep the Kingdom of God from growing. Instead of using words to bring others to Christ, they drive them away. Instead of planting good seeds that will grow and bear fruit they are planting weed seeds that will grow and choke out the good seeds.

 

Technology today gives us great power to communicate with others. But with great power comes great responsibility. We may want to be “cooler online,” but what the world really craves is authentic and truthful “comments” spoken in love.

 

I use a modified version of Psalm 19:14 before I begin the message every Sunday. The un-modified version is this:

 

“Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
   be acceptable to you,
   O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.”

 

The words of our mouths, the “comments” we make, both verbally and on social media, should be acceptable to God.

 

There is a song by a group called Hawk Nelson titled, “Words.” The song was written based primarily on the scripture we read today from James. The words of the chorus are:

 

Words can build you up
Words can break you down
Start a fire in your heart or
Put it out

Let my words be life
Let my words be truth
I don’t wanna say a word
Unless it points the world back to You

 

My challenge to you this week is to remember those words as we “comment” both verbally, in writing, and on social media. Let our comments be life, let our comments be truth, let us not post a comment unless it points the world back to God.

 

Instead of singing “I’m so much cooler online,” let us sing, “I want to be like Jesus online.” I don’t think Brad Paisley will mind.

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

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Fruit of the Spirit: “Gentleness”

 

Fruit of the Spirit: “Gentleness”
A Message on 2 Timothy 2:22-26

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church
July 15, 2018
By Doug Wintermute
dwinterm@yahoo.com

 

2 Timothy 2:22-26 (NRSV)

Shun youthful passions and pursue righteousness, faith, love, and peace, along with those who call on the Lord from a pure heart. 23 Have nothing to do with stupid and senseless controversies; you know that they breed quarrels. 24 And the Lord’s servant must not be quarrelsome but kindly to everyone, an apt teacher, patient, 25 correcting opponents with gentleness. God may perhaps grant that they will repent and come to know the truth, 26 and that they may escape from the snare of the devil, having been held captive by him to do his will.

 

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Today I want to start off our exploration of gentleness being a fruit of the spirit by talking about silk.

 

Yep, silk.

 

As you probably know silk is a material that is made by a specific breed of  moth, the mulberry silkworm Bombyx mori. Silk is produced when the larvae of the moth spins a cocoon in which to stay until it completes its metamorphosis into a moth.

 

Silk is smooth. It is soft. It feel luxurious to the skin.

 

But silk is also strong. Very strong. It is one of the strongest natural fibers. An ounce of silk is 5 times stronger than an ounce of steel.

 

Now if you are like me you have trouble reconciling that something soft can also be strong. But it’s true.

 

Back in World War I airplane pilots wore silk scarves. There were a couple of reasons for that. First it insulated them from the cold as they flew in their open cockpit airplanes. The layers of silk trapped air next to their skin and insulated them from the cold.

 

Plus the open cockpit planes made the pilot’s goggles fog up in foggy weather, and oil leaking from the engine could impair visibility as well. The scarf was used to clean the goggles. It also prevented chaffing on the back of their necks resulting from moving their head around searching the skies for enemy aircraft.

 

But there was another reason they wore it as well. It protected them from more than cold. Some pilots would wrap silk scarves up all around their head several layers deep under a leather helmet because they discovered that the material was effective at stopping flak, little pieces of metal. The softness of the material absorbed the energy of the speeding pieces of metal while the strength of the fibers were effective in sometimes keeping it from penetrating the skin.

 

Silk is known for both it’s strength and softness.

 

That’s kind of what “gentleness” is.  I like this definition given by Wikipedia: “Gentleness is a strong hand with a soft touch. It is a tender, compassionate approach toward others’ weaknesses and limitations. A gentle person still speaks truth, sometimes even painful truth, but in doing so guards his tone so the truth can be well received.”

 

Today I want to continue our sermon series on the “Fruit of the Spirit” listed in Galatians 5 by today looking at “gentleness.” It is a characteristic a person has when he/she lives a Christian life led by the Holy Spirit.

 

Now there are some other words that different translations of the Bible use to describe this particular trait. The King James Version uses the term “meekness.” The Message translates it to a “compassion in the heart.”

 

Part of the problem of living in today’s world, and especially in our society in America, is that gentleness is seen not as a strength but as a weakness. It is not viewed as a positive attribute but instead as a negative one.

 

It’s very rare that you hear someone being commended for their gentleness, but Biblically there are many scriptures that speak about gentleness.

 

James 3:17 says, “Real wisdom, God’s wisdom, begins with a holy life and is characterized by getting along with others. It is gentle and reasonable, overflowing with mercy and blessings, not hot one day and cold the next, not two-faced.” (James 3:17, The Message)

 

Proverbs 15:1 says, “A gentle response defuses anger, but a sharp tongue kindles a temper-fire. (Proverbs 15:1, The Message)

 

Psalm 18:35 says, “You have given me the shield of your salvation, and your right hand supported me, and your gentleness made me great.” (ESV)

 

Titus 3:2 says, “…to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show every courtesy to everyone.”

 

Today’s scripture from 2 Timothy has Paul writing to his young protege Timothy giving him some excellent advice: “Have nothing to do with stupid and senseless controversies; you know that they breed quarrels. And the Lord’s servant must not be quarrelsome but kindly to everyone, an apt teacher, patient, correcting opponents with gentleness.” (2 Timothy 2:23-25)

 

Man, how would the world change if everyone claiming to be a Christian acted in that manner? It seems like today people quarrel for fun, especially on social media. It’s like their favorite past time. They are not “kindly to everyone,” they love to get involved in “stupid and senseless controversies” where they do not by any means “correct(ing) opponents with gentleness.”

 

I got to witness Biblical gentleness this past week at church camp. This last session of church camp (there were four of them) was the largest, with right at 1,000 youth from all over the Texas Conference in attendance.Our church took 59 youth and 11 adults, not as many as in years past but still a whole lot!

 

I worked the elementary camp where we had 250 kids and 50 adult counsellors.

 

One of those counsellors was our own Di Smith.  Now I didn’t get permission to talk about her today because she probably would have told me no. So I’m going to do it anyway and ask her for forgiveness instead of permission.

 

Di went to church camp last week with us and served as a counselor in elementary camp.  We had the largest age group of the camp: 250 kids, 3rd-5th graders, and 50 adults. It was hot, it was humid, it rained, it was crowded, we slept in bunk beds, walked everywhere we went, and the counsellors were with the kids pretty much all of the time without any breaks.

 

Di was there with them the whole week. She was in a room full of girls, one or two of whom were… how can I say this nicely… were quite challenging. But she did it, artificial knee and all. And what I appreciate the most was that she was a great example of gentleness.

 

I came across this quote about gentleness that I think exemplifies what Di did this past week. “Gentleness is not apathy but is an aggressive expression of how we view people. We see people as so valuable that we deal with them in gentleness, fearing the slightest damage to one for whom Christ died. To be apathetic is to turn people over to mean and destructive elements, to truly love people cause for us to be aggressively gentle.” ― Gayle D. Erwin, Spirit Style

 

Di was “aggressively gentle.” She worked the medicine runs with us. She went to the infirmary with injured or sick kids. She participated in almost everything the kids did. Here’s a video of her dancing to the song “Church Clap.” (Show video.) Way to bust a move, Di!

 

Being a counselor she gave advice to the kids. She gave advice to the other counsellors and to me. She helped us through some difficult situations that came up. She was willing to go to great lengths to help others.

 

One night for the evening activity we had “Carnival Night.” There were different booths set up and the kids could earn tokens for things like ring toss, sack race, football bowling (where you throw a football at bowling pins to see how many you can knock down) and things like that. The kids could then use their tokens for various things.

 

One of the things that the kids could do with their tokens was to have someone hit in the face with a shaving cream pie.  It took a lot of tokens to do that, though, more than most of the kids had. Some of the girls used teamwork and pooled their tokens together and selected as their “recipient” Di. And Di obligingly did it. (Show photo.)

 

Di was willing to humble herself in order to make other people, especially the kids, have a good time at camp. She was willing to be silk: soothing and comforting while at the same time strong.

 

There were two boys in our camp that each learned a lesson about gentleness. It was the last day of camp, Friday. We had already had the closing ceremony and kids were being picked up to go home. We were about 15 minutes away from camp being over without there being a serious disagreement or fight among the 250 elementary campers. I was breathing a sigh of relief. I should have known better.

 

We were putting up chairs when I heard a disturbance behind me. I turn around to see “Boy A” as we will call him on the concrete floor with “Boy B” on top of him just beating the thunder out of him. Boy B apparently knew how to fist fight and was landing some serious blows on “Boy A.”

 

Some adults pulled them apart by the time I got to the scene and I took “Boy B” aside mostly to remove him from the situation but also to find out what had caused this behavior. I remember thinking to myself, “15 minutes. Only 15 more minutes…”

 

After Boy B settled down I found out the story. Boy A had been picking on Boy B, calling him some very un-nice names and then hitting him and running away. He kept on picking on him and hitting him and picking on him and hitting him and then did it one time too many times. Boy B had all he could take. He ran Boy A down and commenced to put a serious beatdown on him.

 

The first thing I said to Boy B was “Where are we?” He replied, “In Copeland Auditorium.” “No, I said, “Where have all of us been this past week.” “Church camp,” he said. “Right,” I said. “There’s no fighting at church camp! It’s not a good idea to fight anywhere, but we absolutely don’t fight at church camp.”

 

And then I asked him, “What would Jesus do?”

 

“Walk away,” was his reply.

 

“Yes,” I replied. “And you could have walked away. You could have come and told a counselor of me or any adult what was happening, and then the other boy would have been in trouble and you wouldn’t have.”

 

I know it’s kind of cliche and some of my classmates from seminary would roll their eyes upon hearing it, but it really is a pretty good tool for us as followers of Jesus Christ to frequently ask, “What would Jesus do?”

 

Jesus was gentle. He wasn’t a pushover, he wasn’t powerless, and he had plenty of reasons NOT to be gentle. But he was. He chose to be gentle. He was “aggressively gentle.”

 

So my challenge to you this week is to be like Jesus (and Di Smith at church camp) and be “aggressively gentle.” Live you life in such a way that gentleness happens without you even thinking about it.

 

People are going to get on your nerves. People will mistreat you. People will manipulate you. People will try to walk all over you and take advantage of you. The world tells us to treat them like they treat you. But the Bible tells us to respond with gentleness.

 

Remember that Jesus prayed for forgiveness for the very men who took his life, the ones that beat him and tortured him and nailed him to the cross. And yet he allowed himself to be killed on the cross as a sacrifice for us, a sacrificial, gentle lamb, his love for us providing us with forgiveness of sins and life eternally. If Jesus can do that surely we can be gentle to our fellow humans.

 

Be like silk: gentle but strong. I’m pretty sure Di would approve.

 

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

Fruit of the Spirit: “Patience”

Fruit of the Spirit: “Patience”
A Message on Psalm 37:7-11

For Jacksonville First United Methodist Church
June 17, 2018
By Doug Wintermute
dwinterm@yahoo.com

Psalm 37:7-11 (NRSV)

 

Be still before the Lord, and wait patiently for him;
   do not fret over those who prosper in their way,
   over those who carry out evil devices.

Refrain from anger, and forsake wrath.
   Do not fret—it leads only to evil.
For the wicked shall be cut off,
   but those who wait for the Lord shall inherit the land.

Yet a little while, and the wicked will be no more;
   though you look diligently for their place, they will not be there.
But the meek shall inherit the land,
   and delight themselves in abundant prosperity.

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How many of you are anxious for this service to be over so you can get out of here and go eat lunch?

 

Well there’s a saying about today’s topic that I think will apply to you. It goes something like this:

“When we pray to God for patience, God doesn’t give us patience, he gives us opportunities to practice it.”

 

So, for those anxious souls out there this is an opportunity to practice your patience.

 

Today we are continuing our sermon series on fruit of the Spirit. We have talked about love, joy, and peace, and today we will explore the subject of patience.

 

Patience is the ability to wait for something, but it is also more than that.

 

I found this photo on the Internet. It says,

“Patience is not simply the ability to wait. It’s how we behave while we are waiting.”

 

I think there’s some good theology in that.

 

Last week Pam and I met most of my siblings up at Beavers Bend in Oklahoma for an extended weekend get-together. My nephew’s son (does that make him my great nephew?) Mason, who is in fourth grade, loves to kayak and loves to fish, so one morning he and I loaded up our kayaks and went to the lake to fish. We didn’t catch anything but we had fun.

 

On the way back to the cabin at lunchtime I had to make a left-hand turn onto the main highway. There was a car in front of us that was doing the same thing. Traffic was pretty heavy but there were times where the driver of the car in front of me, a woman, had time to make the turn. But she didn’t. Finally, in anxiousness, I said out loud something like, “Come on, lady! You could have made that. Get it in gear!”

 

As soon as I had said it I heard Mason say in the same tone I did, “Yeah, lady! Get it in gear!”

 

Oops.

 

I had lost my patience and my great nephew not only picked up on it, he started mimicking it.

 

Ouch.

 

We live in an instant gratification society. And yet the Bible tells us that we should have patience. Paul goes so far as to list it as a fruit of the Spirit, number four to be exact.

 

Patience.

 

In 1 Corinthians 13 we read that it is at the list of what love is: “Love is patient…”

 

Ephesians 4:2 says, “…with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love…”

 

Colossians 3:12 says, “As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience.”

 

I really like what it says in James 5:7, “Be patient, therefore, beloved, until the coming of the Lord. The farmer waits for the precious crop from the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains.”

 

Farmers know about patience. The thing I like most about this time of year is the fresh produce. I’m growing some tomatoes and peppers in containers this year and it shows me just how much I have missed having a garden.

 

To me there are few things in this world that taste better than a fresh-picked, red-ripe, home-grown tomato. It’s something you just don’t get with store-bought tomatoes. But it takes a while to grow tomatoes. One variety I planted takes about 50 days from seed to harvest. Another variety takes from 80 to 100 days from seed to harvest. That’s about three months. And during that time the plants need watering, feeding with fertilizer, weeding, etc.

 

Three months. But the you get red-ripe, delicious tomatoes.

 

Patience is a virtue for a reason. And patience is a fruit of the Spirit for a reason.

 

Listen to how much importance patience is give in the section of Psalm 37 that we read today:

 

Be still before the Lord, and wait patiently for him;
   do not fret over those who prosper in their way,
   over those who carry out evil devices.

Refrain from anger, and forsake wrath.
   Do not fret—it leads only to evil.
For the wicked shall be cut off,
   but those who wait for the Lord shall inherit the land.

Yet a little while, and the wicked will be no more;
   though you look diligently for their place, they will not be there.
But the meek shall inherit the land,
   and delight themselves in abundant prosperity. (Psalm 37:7-11)

 

Wait for the Lord. Psalm 27:14 says, “Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord!”

 

Now waiting for the Lord had special meaning for the Old Testament Hebrew people. Prophets had come and gone and had written and talked about a messiah that was coming, someone who would make all things right and good for the Jewish people. So who would this Messiah be? When would the Messiah come?

 

For thousands of years they waited. They had to have patience. They had to practice patience.

 

And then Jesus arrives on earth. The Messiah comes. The thousands of years of waiting were over. God comes to earth and dwells among humans. But some people, the religious people, ironically, don’t believe it so they have him killed. But he doesn’t stay dead, he rises from the dead. And he promises that he will return one day. In the meantime we are to work for the Lord and be patient.

 

It’s not easy to be patient, is it?

 

Let’s do a little experiment. I’m going to be quiet and just let time pass. Let’s be quiet and see what happens. (Time the silence.)

 

Kinda awkward, wasn’t it? How long do you think it was? I timed it. It was 30 seconds. Half a minute. But it sure felt longer, didn’t it.

 

Back in my previous career as a journalist I was taught a technique that takes advantage of humans’ awkwardness with silence. It’s called the “pregnant pause.” If I was interviewing someone and asked them a question and they answered, but I didn’t respond but just kept looking at them, 9-out-of-10 times they would start talking again just to fill the void of silence.

 

It’s difficult to wait, to be patient. And yet it is not only a virtue, but it is a fruit of the Spirit.

 

So my challenge for you this week is to be patient. Be patient with our fellow brothers and sisters who get all over our nerves. Be patient with the person in front of you who is going to slow or who takes too long to turn left. Be patient with those who aren’t as far along in their faith journey as you are. Be patient with those who are way ahead of you as well. Be patient with yourself.

 

Practice patience. Practice patience. Practice patience.

 

In the name of the Father (pause), and the Son (pause), and the Holy Spirit (pause), Amen.

 

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The Path

Join us tonight for an evening of Praise and Prayer with Rev. Von Dawson. Worship will begin at 6:30 p.m.

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Another Side Of Sunday: The Path

We invite you to enjoy a post from Jeremiah’s Menu as you continue your path from the empty tomb.

Today… I was a picture of His hands at work…

She told me Friday… I need you to come to Praise & Prayer and knit… she said I would be the demonstration…

Through the entire service…? I asked…

Yes…

Well… OK… if it helps people to connect with Him… Amen…

So this morning… I sat at the front of the small gathering… on a single stool… ball of yarn on the floor… knitting… Read more

 

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Childlike Faith for Your Weekend

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Everything is beautiful in it’s own way
Like a starry summer night
On a snow covered winter’s day
And everybody’s beautiful in their own way
Under God’s Heaven
The world’s gonna find the way.

–Ray Stevens

May God’s beauty become evident to you as you find your way in the weekend’s rest and rejuvenation.

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Another Side of Sunday: For your weekend listening

They lyrics of a song caught my attention yesterday. Hearing the word anchor reminded me of this week’s scripture.

We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest forever after the order of Melchizedek.–Hebrews 6:19-20

Music can often inspire another look at God’s word. Enjoy!